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Bill Murphy's RedZone Podcast | Innovation, Strategy, Leadership, 10X Thinking, Mindset and More.....

CIO and Business IT Leader Innovation, Leadership, Strategy, 10X Thinking, Mindset and more..
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Bill Murphy's RedZone Podcast | Innovation, Strategy, Leadership, 10X Thinking, Mindset and More.....
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Now displaying: 2022
Oct 3, 2022

Technology has been around long before we were born. Today, we welcome Kevin Kelly back to the show. Kevin Kelly, a modern futurist, is the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Review. In addition, Kevin is also a writer, photographer, and conservationist.  

In the episode, Kevin speaks to listeners about technological revolutions and offers his knowledge on the future of AI. With inspiration from Amish traditions, Kevin explains that the technological advancements that are bound to happen in the future are inevitable and are driven by technological trends that have already been in motion. 

Tune in to learn why understanding what is occurring today is the most powerful starting point for the future.

As a CIO and Business IT Leader here are some wins you will get by listening:

  • Kevin [1:54] When we talk about technology, we should be talking about the 95% of it that's been around long before we were born.
  • Kevin [2:27] There is more technology being made than we individually can use ourselves.
  • Kevin [2:49] The primary difference between the Amish and us is that they decide collectively on what to choose, whereas we decide individually.
  • Kevin [6:14] Identifying the qualities you want in a technology can help you choose which new technology to use.
  • Kevin [7:16] Be a minimalist in terms of the technologies you use daily but be a maximalist in terms of encouraging the abundance of technological choices.
  • Kevin [8:20]: Technology leads to choices.
  • Kevin [9:14] Technology is about doing things now that we could not before, even though the old forms of technology stick around.
  • Kevin [13:16] What will be important tomorrow began two or three decades ago.
  • Kevin [18:25] The goal of AI is not to replicate humans, but to encourage the benefit of having a technology that thinks differently from us.
  • Kevin [21:16] AI is not superhuman intelligence that grows smarter, AI is about making a planet-sized machine of all connected devices to create a world brain.
  • Kevin [23:14] Global planetary awareness is critical when it comes to technology and securing technology.
  • Kevin [24:29] The way that information flows around the world is a non-linear system.
  • Kevin [25:34] The idea of ownership, intellectual property, and copyright have been mistaken. It’s not possible for people to own ideas or data because of inter-relationships.
  • Kevin [25:59] New ideas are a recombination of existing things.
  • Kevin [26:20] New innovations have the same attributes as an ecosystem.
  • Kevin [34:00] Will the AR world be economically and culturally bigger than the VR world?
  • Kevin [38:50] Facial recognition is an example of the conundrum with the idea of ownership. Who owns your face? When we have VR and AR worlds, people will be claiming ownership which is the wrong model.
  • Kevin [41:30] NFT’s gives you zero copyright claims, unless it’s part of the contract.
  • Kevin [46:36] The best ideas are the ones that nobody likes or wants to pursue.
  • Bill [49:23] Instead of trying to figure out who's going to buy something, focus on your own internal enthusiasm for a subject. Let your enthusiasm be the GPS and people will follow.

 

Key Resources:

Sep 6, 2022

Welcome back to Bill Murphy’s 10x Podcast. Our guest in this episode is John Arsneault, CIO at Goulston & Storrs, a venture capital investor and a startup advisor. With over 30 years in the tech industry, John is an expert strategist ensuring business growth.   

John began his career repairing PCs at an after-school job before transitioning to working for a small venture capital company in Boston. Through this experience and by observing his co-workers making investment deals, he found an interest in investing. 

Fast forward to today, he is now the founder of Portfolio X, a venture capital company that invests in emerging technologies. John is passionate about offering investing advice, and emphasizes the importance of betting on a person, not their ideas. John also talks about his role as CIO and strongly encourages us to be the curators of change within our organizations. 

In addition to his useful advice, John tells us about his family roots in Maine, his love for baseball, and explains to us that we do not need a grand plan to be successful. Through hard work, making mistakes, and trying a couple of times, growth is achieved, and remarkable things happen. 

Oh, and did someone say flying cars? Tune in and listen to the Podcast to learn more.

 

As a Chief Information Officer and Business IT Leader here are the wins you will get by listening: 

Bill [11:12] “There is some wisdom in non-traditional paths as far as what growth opportunities it gives people.” 

John [12:42] After working at a small venture capital company in Boston, John developed a strong interest in investing.  

John [13:12] There are two streams of technology professionals in the world. The people that maintain technology environments for enterprise or existing businesses. Then there are people that work in the actual tech industry.  

John [13:42] Realizing you could go work for a technology company and be the product itself, not just the back office necessary expenditure, was exciting because this meant that you are building an actual product while earning equity.  

John [15:42] Everything a person learns is the outcome of watching, making mistakes, and trying a couple of times until they got it right.  

John: [16:12] The biggest mistake that people make when entering the world of investing is, they get so enamored with somebody’s idea. There are lots of entrepreneurs that have cool ideas. There are very few of them that can turn that idea into a functioning burgeoning business.  

John [16:42] In these days investing is cloudy because it is easy to get venture capital, but in the past, it was hard. So, people assumed that if somebody got funded the company was destined to do well, however 90% of new businesses fail. 

Bill [17:12] Are we betting on the idea? Or are we betting on a growing business? 

John [17:42] You bet on the entrepreneurs themselves and not the ideas.  

John [18:42] When investing, be on the side of something that has already proven itself in the marketplace, has brand recognition, and seems obvious that it’s the new way to do it.  

John [20:42] Over the last five years, everything has become a technology startup. Even existing businesses in a way are becoming technology startups within themselves.  

John [23:12] You have no crystal ball. You do not know if entrepreneurs are going to guide the business properly, but to make an informed decision you can look at what they’ve done and how they’ve gotten to that point.  

John [24:42] Private market exchanges  

John [28:42] You can do all the homework in the world, at the end of the day you just do not how things are going to turn out. 

John [31:12] A spec is a special all-purpose collection of equity investors.  

Bill [34:42] Apps and technologies are so quick that they outstrip our ability to regulate. 

John [35:12] The next iteration of innovation is going to be technologies that bump up against compliance and regulation. 

John [36:12] There is technology that already exists but is not being utilized because it’s not yet legal.  

John [37:12] Regulation and compliance must catch up with technology, or the technology is going to slow down.  

John [39:42] 40% of the world’s population have never been on the internet.  

John [40:42] People can suddenly go from being behind the rest of the world by a hundred years, but in a split second can be ahead of everybody because their adoption rate will not be getting rid of the old thing but going right to the modern setup.  

John [40:57] The biggest barrier for the United States to be competitive in the next hundred years is going to be our will to adopt new things.  

John [43:42] A CIO's role traditionally in a law firm was to put together the technical Legos to make people efficient and allow them to do their jobs. However, in the next decade, the CIO's role is going to be to help protect the business. 

John [44:42] Innovators are coming into the legal industry with no intention of taking the technology that they develop and licensing it to law firms. They want to build platforms that will allow them to take clients away and build processes that facilitate legal happenings within the platform itself.  

John [46:20] It took Amazon 25 years to build their successful e-commerce fulfillment model that disrupted the rest of the industry. Once companies realized where they were failing, it was too late 

John [47:42] I can't tell them, this is exactly how they need to approach all this innovation, but I can tell them that they need to pay attention. There are going to be moments of clarity, you must watch for it.  

John [51:42] As a CIO, look outside your own industry for what is going to happen. 

 

Resources 

Steve Case’s The Third Wave 

A360 Summit 

Legal Tech Fund 

Gartner 

Singularity University 

Peter Diamandis 

Northeastern University 

Boston College High School (BC High) 

Fenway Park  

Portfolio X 

Goulston & Storrs 

 

Love this episode? Leave a Review

Share it on your LinkedIn feed.

If you have not already, please leave us a review on iTunes. 

 

About Bill Murphy 

Bill Murphy is a world-renowned IT Security Expert dedicated to your success as an IT business leader. Follow Bill on LinkedIn. 

If you are interested in learning more about RedZone Technologies, and its security expertise, email us at info@redzonetech.net 

Aug 1, 2022

Welcome Back to Bill Murphy’s 10x Podcast. Our guest in this episode is Peter Cohan, founder and principal of The Second Derivative, author of “Great Demo!” and a savant in the sales world.  

Additionally, Peter serves on the Board of Directors for Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc., is an advisor to IN2SV, Inc., holds a degree in chemistry, and is a mentor to StartX, the Stanford University start-up accelerator. 

Peter has vast experience working with senior management in marketing, sales, and business development. and has learned to discover and understand the needs of a customer. Peter’s mission is to advise organizations on the ways they can better improve their sales and marketing results through creating and executing compelling demonstrations.  

In this episode, he shares with listeners his best-known method, the “Last Thing First,” which teaches you to “turn the demo upside down” and start with the end-result first. 

You do not have to be in sales to benefit from Peter’s methods, his principles prove valuable to many parts of an organization 

Peter hopes to inspire you to constantly seek ways to improve upon your skills and practices. 

Show your customers the possibilities that will benefit the future of their business and an end- result that cannot be refused. 

Tune in to learn more.

 

As a Chief Information Officer and Business IT Leader here are some wins you will get by listening: 

4:00 There are two roles of an IT Leader: offense and defense. The defense protects the kingdom, keeps the lights on, and ensures the users are happy. The offense helps put points on the board and supports sales.  

5:00 Modern IT leaders can support sales in the future by providing subject matter expertise to the sales team, enabling a demo environment, and seeking to understand where the organization needs to go and what can be done to help by providing tools and services.  

6:30 The key success factor in the pre-sales process is having a structured way of communicating information. 

6:40 “The Great Demo” introduces a structure called the situation slide, which is used to recommunicate key pieces of information to deliver a credible demo.  

8:00 Before you call a prospect, have a conversation with the vendor and ask: What is our objective for this demo? What do we know about this prospect? What do you want me to present in this demo? What do you not want me to present in this demo? 

10:00 The key element in creating any demo is understanding what specific capabilities a prospect needs to see versus everything else that is in your offering.  

11:30 Find sales representatives who are highly respected and use those people as your models to learn their best practices. 

12:00 Successful sales reps execute the most important part of the sales process: sufficient discovery of the customer's needs followed by communicating those discoveries with the team. 

18:30 Vision generation demos spark interest and highlight what is possible. 

20:30 Lead with pictures of graphs, reports, and dashboards to present complex ideas in a straightforward way. Do not bury people in complexity.  

23:30 The goal of a demo is to show your customer a “menu” of your offerings. If you are offering several different modules, utilize vision generation.  

27:00 In a demo, do not show a prospect a boring boat. Show them that it is a battleship driving through the heavy seas. This is the result a prospect is looking for. 

28:00 The higher you go in an organization, the less they care about the process and more just the end-result. Turn the demo upside down and do that last thing first.  

32:30 A successful salesperson is interested in continually improving his or her process.  

 

Resources:  

Great Demo Book 

GreatDemo.com 

LessIsMore.com (For PowerPoint Presentations)  

Information is Beautiful 

_____________________________________________________________________ 

Love this episode? Leave a Review 

Share it on your LinkedIn feed. 

If you have not already, please leave us a review on iTunes. 

______________________________________________________________________ 

About Bill Murphy 

Bill Murphy is a world-renowned IT Security Expert dedicated to your success as an IT business leader. Follow Bill on LinkedIn. 

If you are interested in learning more about RedZone Technologies, and its security expertise, email us at info@redzonetech.ne

Jul 1, 2022

Welcome Back to Bill Murphy’s 10x Podcast. Our guest in this episode is Brian Chidester, award-winning, public sector marketing executive, and expert integrated messaging strategist. Brian is currently the Industry Vice President at Genesys, an Advisor to the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance, and a member of the Forbes Technology Council.  

Today, Brian shares with listeners the benefits of developing smart cities and explains how they promote sustainable practices that will address growing urbanization challenges that cities face. By leveraging the data that smart cities provide, stewards within a community can help make better decisions on behalf of the constituents.  

As a supporter of smart city evolution, Brian shares examples to describe how process efficiency, edge computing, and curb management can help advocate for the future and advancements of smart cities. 

Tune in today and learn about the possibilities smart cities are providing our communities.

As a Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Business IT Leader here are some wins you will get by listening: 

[5:30] Brian: To be a true advisor to sales leadership, you must have a deep understanding of the market and the reason behind what you are doing.  

[7:00] Brian: Anyone working in the technology sector begins to realize that everything is interconnected. 

[8:00] Brian: When looking at the government space, it pulls you into an experience. The experience can be a digital experience through your mobile device, tablet, or computer, but it also evolves into smart cities. 

[9:00] Brian: A smart city is a framework, an idea, that is composed of information communications technology (ICT). 

[9:40] Brian: The idea behind smart cities is to develop and promote sustainable practices that help address growing and advancing urbanization challenges that cities face.  

[9:55] Brian: A foundational piece of a smart city is cloud. Cloud-based IoT applications and sensors can receive, analyze, and manage data in real time to help improve the quality of life for citizens living in a city or connected community. 

[10:30] Brian: The most important piece that comes from the cloud based IoT applications is the data. The data provides insights so that stewards within the community can make better decisions on behalf of the constituents. 

[11:30] Brian: London pioneered the initial smart city.  

[12:55] Brian: Smaller cities have the greatest innovation despite having a smaller budget because they do not have to go through policy roadblocks that stand in the way of bigger cities.  

[13:50] Brian: For example, when it comes to trash removal, technology is not added to help get the trash out faster but to understand where the process slows down. Therefore, technology is used for process efficiency.  

[14:35] Brian: In Buffalo, NY the city turned trash removal trucks into moving sensors by adding video cameras, leveraging AI (Artificial Intelligence), and using 5G capabilities to find potholes that need to be filled.  

[15:25] Brian: Edge computing is the ability to process data at the point. An example of this is a sensor.  

[16:00] Brian: Edge computing and 5G from an infrastructure perspective can allow quick reaction times to help the evolution of smart cities. 

[17:00] Brian: The concerns surrounding 5G are the pockets of the broadband infrastructure. Smart cities can help with digital equity, but one of the biggest challenges is access to broadband.  

[19:10] Brian: GDPR and the Europeans are ahead of the US when it comes to privacy practices and policies.  

[20:14] Brian: Security of data is critical for protecting privacy. With new video footage capabilities such as speed cameras or security cameras, we must ensure this information does not fall into the wrong hands.  

[21:30] Brian: Policy is always lagging behind technology. That is why the government tends to be late adopters of technology. 

[24:30] Brian: There is a lot of value that data can bring to the citizen.  

[24:38] Curb management is a big trend happening with smart cities because of curb real estate. The data surrounding curb management can help cities identify how to manage and optimize curb space to allow for curb demands.  An example of this is DoorDash pickups and drop offs.  

[26:04] Brian: A big topic that's being looked at within smart cities is how to help address climate change. How can we lower the city's carbon footprint by leveraging smart devices? 

[29:07] Brian: The City of Chattanooga is looking at how they can prevent car accidents and pedestrian deaths by having a sensor speak to a vehicle which then stops it when the car gets close to a crosswalk.  

[29:53] Brian: When we think of smart cities, it's an ecosystem. It's not just about a device here and there. It's a framework and policies, but it is also a complete ecosystem that plays together.  

[30:05] Brian: Look to the Googles and the Apples of the world that have next generation technology and understand what that is, where it's going, and how it can be enveloped properly into the smart city ecosystem. 

[33:05] Brian: What does the future of smart cities look like? It starts with the data. Then, it's what the city's going to do on behalf of its citizens. It's not about technologies and sensors, but it's about how the cities can become smarter from the data that's ingested to be more prescriptive for their citizens. 

[33:53] Brian: How will the metaverse impact smart cities and digital experiences for citizens? Both augmented reality and virtual reality are giving governments opportunities to be able to meet the next generation of citizens. 

[38:00] Brian: The goal of smart cities is to provide citizens with the types of technology and the types of services that are needed within their area. You're not beholden to just what you've had in the past.  

[41:48] Brian: It's not just about getting technology into the hands of the community. It's understanding how to best use and push the adoption of this technology and do it in a way that's going to drive the type of outcomes they are looking for.

 

Resources

World Economic Forum 

OpenText 

G20 Global Smart City Alliance 

The Program: Shot Spotter 

Open Government Partnership 

Kevin Kelly’s “What Technology Wants” 

Brian Chidester’s Podcast “The Government Huddle” 

 

Love this episode? Leave a Review 

Share it on your LinkedIn feed. 

If you have not already, please leave us a review on iTunes. 

 

About Bill Murphy 

Bill Murphy is a world-renowned IT Security Expert dedicated to your success as an IT business leader. Follow Bill on LinkedIn. 

If you are interested in learning more about RedZone Technologies, and its security expertise, email us at info@redzonetech.net 

May 20, 2022

Welcome Back to Bill Murphy’s 10x Podcast. Our guest in this episode is Dan Roam, international bestselling author of “The Back of the Napkin” and “The Pop-Up Pitch”. In addition to his literary works, Dan is also a visual strategist, pilot, and father of two.  

Dan shares with listeners that his purpose in life is to help businesses solve complex problems by using visual art. With inspiration from Jeffery Campbell's "The Hero's Journey," Dan encourages listeners to take bold moves when solving present-day problems and emphasizes believing in new solutions to spark growth and change for the future.  

Dan shares with us the details of his book, "The Pop-Up Pitch," and explains how, in just 7 minutes, teams can collaboratively solve complex business problems by drawing simple pictures and teaches listeners how to become the most persuasive communicators in the conference room. 

 Join us today on a journey into the world of storytelling and visual art.  

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